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6 replies [Last post]
akbaby
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Joined: 02/23/2010

I know there's a breastfeeding section, but this is more of a pumping question...
I would love to breastfeed our daughter, but I know that thinking that I will NEVER need to pump (lets face it as much as I'll want to be with her 24/7 that's not always possible) is irrational. My question for you ladies that primarily breastfeed, but have to occasionally pump is.. how much stuff do I really need? I'm putting together our registry and if you go by what the companies suggest it'd easily total close to $1000!! But that's the company trying to make money. For the "occasional pumper", how many bottles do you ladies recommend? And do I really need the special cleaning brush, and bottle sanitizer and bottle warmer and special seal caps and 3 different kinds of nipples and everything that they advertise? I'm a simplistic kind of girl, a pump and a couple bottle should be fine... or am I not thinking realistically? I honestly have no idea when it comes to the whole pumping thing.. Thanks for any and all advice Smile
~Carrie

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Carrie
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Swappy kris
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Joined: 01/19/2011

I have the same question. I would like to know about it too. I am going to breast feed but occasionally will require pumping when I am away for few hours.

Waiting for replies on it..

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baby dust to all.. Smile

jadenkoalsmom
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Joined: 09/15/2009

Ok for starters most breast pumps come with 2 bottles and nipples.. you can either use those or buy some of your own, as for how many bottles you need well that all depends on how much you want to pump if you are only doing it once and awhile then the 2 bottles the pump comes with are fine... oh and you wont really need the bottle sanitizer either... I have one and use it all the time but when I was breast feeding and pumping once every few days.. then I would only have maybe 1 or 2 bottles every few days and the dishwasher cleans them.. make sure your bottles are dish washer safe.. most are and most pump parts are too.. as for storage containers i used the breast milk bags... i just thought they are easy to use and already sanitized and ready to go after pumping.. i hope that helps good luck!!

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baby lily was born march 18th 2011
baby Owen was born november 26th 2014

Swappy kris
Swappy kris's picture
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Joined: 01/19/2011

thanks jadenkoalsmom.. your reply has helped me understand what all i really need. instead of buying tons n tons of other stuffs. thanks Smile

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baby dust to all.. Smile

akbaby
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Joined: 02/23/2010

Thanks for the info!!! That really helps me a lot to know that I really don't need all the stuff the stores would guilt me into buying lol. Thank you!!

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Carrie
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jadenkoalsmom
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Joined: 09/15/2009

no problem at all I am glad i can help Smile

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baby lily was born march 18th 2011
baby Owen was born november 26th 2014

mimimommy
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Joined: 08/27/2011

Carrie, I know this isn't really the question you asked, but I can tell you for a fact that occasional pumping has ruined breastfeeding for many moms and babies. Sure pumping can save breastfeeding too, in cases where mom and baby absolutely have to be seperated, as in hospitalization or employment. But the typical story goes like this: Mom pumps some of her milk (usually in the early days when she's engorged) and saves her breastmilk. Then she goes out for an evening and leaves her baby with some of her milk. Fine, right? Except that during the, let's say, 4 hours she's gone (which is much longer than a younger baby can typically go without a feeding) she is becoming very engorged, and will most likely not have her pump along (after all, that almost defeats the purpose of a night out) and so just endures the engorgement. Her body is getting the message that the baby is not very hungry, so stops producing as much milk. Meanwhile, the baby is getting the bottle, which doesn't require nearly as much effort to suckt from, and quickly gets the message that bottles are easier. Next time the mom tries to pump, she will notice that there is not nearly as much milk coming out (which is normal, pumps just aren't as efficient as baby) and will assume that she's incapable of producing enough, so she throws in some formula. Baby is getting the bottle more and more, and becoming more and more inefficient at nursing, as well as fussy at the breast. At some point the mom may decide that it easier to just pump and bottle feed (along with formula) but finds her milk supply is quickly dwindling away (again, pumps just don't do the same job). In the very many cases that I have seen this happen, baby was completely on formula by 4 months for sure. Also, since the mom had only planned to pump occasionally, she will likely not invest in a costly double-electric, hospital grade pump, but rather something cheaper, which is even less likely to do the job right. So unless you plan on spending close to a grand on a hospital grade machine and plan on lugging that thing around with you everywhere if you don't have your baby along, you may be looking at that scenario. And even if you plan on doing that, wouldn't if be so much easier to just have your baby along? Really I found the 0-6 month stage the easiest to take my baby places, because he was happy just to be with me. And after 6 months they start eating solids too, so they can just have that if you're only going to be gone for a few hours. It sounds like a sacrifice, but I like looking at it as an investment. You really can take your baby everywhere. By the way, I realize that the above described scenario does not happen to everyone who pumps occasionally, but even if they manage to make it work, is the hassle involved really so much easier than taking your baby along?
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